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HERE IS HOW THE GOVERNMENT SHUT MAY AFFECT YOU AND YOUR FAMILY:



U.S. government services would be disrupted and hundreds of thousands of federal workers furloughed without pay if Congress fails to provide funding for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1. Workers deemed "essential" would remain on the job, but without pay.

Many government agencies have not updated shutdown plans they have prepared in the past. Here is a guide to what would stay open and what would shut down:



MILITARY-AWARDED CONTRACT PAYMENTS

The 2 million U.S. military personnel would remain at their posts, but roughly half of the Pentagon's 800,000 civilian employees would be furloughed.

Contracts awarded before the shutdown would continue, and the Pentagon could place new orders for supplies or services needed to protect national security. Other new contracts, including renewals or extensions, would not be awarded. Payments to defense contractors such as Boeing (BA.N), Lockheed Martin (LMT.N) and RTX (RTX.N), formerly known as Raytheon, could be delayed. Your payment for contracts maybe delayed.


FEDERAL COURTS

Federal courts have enough money to stay open until at least Oct. 13. Activities might be scaled back after that point. The Supreme Court would stay open as well.


TRANSPORTATION

Airport security screeners and air-traffic control workers would be required to work, according to recent contingency plans, though absenteeism could be a problem. Some airports had to suspend operations during a shutdown in 2019 when traffic controllers called in sick.

Training for new air traffic controllers would stop, which Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has warned could worsen a shortage of qualified workers. Some major infrastructure projects could face delays as environmental reviews and permitting would be disrupted, according to the White House.


NATIONAL PARKS AND NATURAL RESOURCES

It's not clear how national parks, national monuments and other sites would be affected. Many remained open during a 2018-2019 shutdown, through restrooms and information desks were closed and waste disposal was halted. They were closed during a 2013 shutdown.

Wildfire fighting efforts would continue, according to the Agriculture Department's 2020 contingency plan, though timber sales on national forest lands would be curtailed and fewer recreation permits would be issued.


SOCIAL SECURITY, MEDICARE AND OTHER BENEFITS

The Social Security Administration would continue to issue retirement and disability benefits, and payments would continue under the Medicare and Medicaid health programs. Military veterans' benefits would also continue, according to a 2021 contingency plan. Food assistance administered through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program could be affected, as grocery stores would not be able to renew their licenses.


TAX COLLECTION

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) would operate as normal, and all 83,000 employees would continue to be paid because the agency's funding would not expire.


DISASTER RESPONSE

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) would risk running out of funds for disaster relief and long-term recovery projects.


EDUCATION

Pell Grants and student loans would continue to be paid, but could be disrupted as most Education Department employees would be furloughed, according to the agency's 2021 plan.

A protracted shutdown could "severely curtail" aid to schools, universities and other educational institutions, the department says. It also could delay funds that are due to be awarded later in the year.


CHILD CARE

According to the White House, 10,000 children from low-income families would lose access to the Head Start preschool program.


SMALL BUSINESS SUPPORT

The Small Business Administration would not be able to issue any new loans, though loans for businesses hurt by natural disasters would continue.


MAIL DELIVERY

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) would be unaffected as it does not depend on Congress for funding.

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